Best app/tool to use at events


(Nick Lawson) #1

I’m interested to know what good apps/tools you people are using at events, for example to help make their lives easier?

Mine is bit standard but I always have Twitter open on my phone. I usually ask people to use an event hashtag so it’s really easy to keep an eye on what your attendees are talking about on Twitter during the event. There usually a fair amount of moaning about the room temperature, but also good discussion on the whatever is going on e.g. a talk/presentation.


Introduce yourself to the EventTribe community!
(Chris Massey) #2

It kind of depends on what aspect of the event you’re managing! I’m pretty sure @James.Mayes is glued to twitter for our events, but I live in WhatsApp to manage our volunteer crew, and I make a point of building the whole day’s schedule into my phone’s calendar ahead of time (every session, every break) so that I can relax and know I’ll get a heads-up just before, for example, thirsty crowds are about to appear looking for coffee!

Combine those with a smart-watch, and I feel really relaxed and confident that I’ve got a handle on what’s going on, and I can focus on responding to things that need my attention.


(Nick Lawson) #3

Nice! sounds like you have that pretty locked down. :ok_hand:


(James Mayes) #4

Glued is an understatement! I kick off by live-tweeting the thing, so as to get the rest of the audience really involved. Once they take it and start running, I can then step off the tweeting and get more to monitoring and engaging - so its about taking the audience in the direction we think it best for all. I’ll usually clear 2-300 tweets myself during the course of a single event day, in addition to monitoring everything on the hashtag. For our last major conference, we hit something like 17m impressions on that, so I think we’re actually approaching the point where I need to add some smarter listening into the mix.

Worth noting - Twitter isn’t just great for the content amplification, it’s also good for logistics, complaint handling, information broadcast. It’s the first place people will usually go to complain, so it’s a great way to catch problems early - if you’re listening closely enough!


(Mark Dalgarno) #5

@Jacqui_Davidson recently blogged about our experiments with Slack:


(Jacqui Davidson) #6

We tried Slack at our couple of events last year to develop and grow participant collaboration plus build excitement about the event. It made sharing pre conf info much easier (zero emailed question the day before the event) and the particpants really engaged with it. Many commented that it added an extra networking dimension and they felt more connected to the event.
We had some concerns that it would impact our Twitter feed but these were unfounded, we still trended high.


Using Slack For Your Event
(Nick Lawson) #7

That’s a great idea, especially with regards to reducing email contacts. Interesting that this didn’t reduce Twitter noise - did you see a different in the style/type of conversations attendees were having on each platform?


(Nick Lawson) #8

@James.Mayes definitely! I imagine being able to leverage this data would be pretty handy when pitching to potential sponsors.

Off the top of my head, I’ve used Audiense before as a social listening tool which has been pretty good. You can monitor hashtags and keywords, and then get good analysis on what’s being said and they people themselves who are talking. However if you’ve got some decent budget I imagine there’s some more powerful stuff out there.


(James Eder) #9

Hi all - great to see this flow as we’re speaking with event organisers at the moment re: the App we’ve launched called Causr. We’re positioning it not as an event App but very useful for events I guess similar to how people are using Slack or WhatsApp. It’s 1-2-1 communication vrs broadcast for messaging.

It’s on iOS only and it’s based on location - the premise is often people arrive the night before an event somewhere, have dinner by themselves, travel from around the world, stay a few days after, during the event helping people to connect, then once they’ve a shared a same experience - 6 months later if they knew they were near someone that also attended an event that provides a huge amount of value to event organisers - well that’s our narrative at the moment anyway.

Would anyone be willing to take a look at the App and provide some feedback for us? thanks


(Aman Brar) #10

Hey Nick, have you heard of http://www.hivertech.com/ - great new app for in person networking.

There’s also a fantastic Q&A website (the name of which escapes me right now), which included a live (or moderated) view of tweets to your hashtag which you can project on a wall, along with any questions which can be upvoted by other audience members via mobile. Perfect for a panel discussion!


(Abena P) #11

@Aman I’d be interested in that Q&A website! Especially if it is a website, rather than an app that you have to download.

I’d love to get attendees thinking about questions before the event so that these could be upvoted in advance. I think that would reduce no-show rates as well because attendees would feel more involved.


(Aman Brar) #12

Had to ask an old colleague - it’s called Sli.do! https://www.sli.do/

Really fantastic, and that was when I was using it 18 months ago, i’m sure they’ve improved it since then! Try it out :slight_smile:


(Nick Lawson) #13

Agree about sli.do, we were singing it’s praises a few days ago over here:

Hiver looks great. Certainly gets rid of the need to remember peoples names which i’m terrible at. My question would be how accurate is the geo location? At a busy networking session you’ll be pretty close to a lot of people so it might pick up a lot of people you didn’t interact with. That said I suppose it’s not a lot of effort to sift through their LinkedIn profiles on the app to find the people you spoke to.


(Abena P) #14

That’s great, I’m going to try Sli.do! Thanks for the suggestions!


(Marino Fresch) #15

Glisser is also worth checking out - essentially it enables interactive presentations, including things live social sharing by attendees of slides from speaker’s presentations, and slide downloading. It’s got some overlap with Sli.do, but where Sli.do is particularly strong for Q&A and polling, Glisser can work well for sharing slides / presentations.


(Lyon Lim) #16

Hi Nick, Marino,

I’m late to the discussion but besides Slido and Glisser, do check out Pigeonhole Live as well. We recently launched a freemium option. Besides crowdsourced Q&A and real-time polls, we also allow event organisers to build a full programme agenda complete with speaker profiles and more.


(Shaena Harrison) #18

Some of my favourites are:

https://howdy.co/ – an intelligent networking app where you can host your communities and attendees so they can get to know each other before, during and after the event.

https://www.mentimeter.com/ - Interactive presentations, workshops and meetings.


(David Nalbandian) #20

I would suggest you go for eventsurvey360 which is event management tool. One can do all activities of event.You can run surveys,quizzes and awesome feature of this tool is you can also offer rewards to your event participants based on in built casino reward selection which is randomly pick the winner. One can also redeem those rewards in marketplace in eventsurvey360. This site consists of number templates for surveys and guidance to how one has to follow to create questions in surveys after the event


(Navin Todi) #21

Even I use EventSurvey360! Quite feasible to manage the event for a small team!