Contingency planning - plan B, C, D, E, F, G


(Abena P) #1

What do you all do in terms of terms of contingency planning for your corporate events? Do you have backups, in case a speaker pulls out at the last minute? What about if the technology doesn’t work as planned, or extra people turn up on the door that you weren’t expecting?


(Mike BA) #2

Interesting questions there Abena! A must have for any event planner. I can’t wait to read what you guys have on this. The only contingency plan I usually have a basically relying on my network especially for last min.venue change! It’s important to rely on one’s network of friends, business partners and, at times, clients! That’s what’s always worked for me!


(Chris Massey) #3

Our technology contingencies are basically to test the hell out of everything the day before, and be very thorough in how we configure everything. My goal with the registration setup (for example) is to literally get it to a point where we can take the kit out of the box, power it up, and start checking people in instantly.


(Allison Pinney Collis) #4

Coincidentally I was asked to draft a risk register for a client recently with mitigating options and solutions which included everything from project burn, speaker drop out, venue change, technical failure, lack of audience engagement… Its a live document and I’m constantly reviewing the options. Intrigued to hear others strategy


(Belinda Booker) #5

With regards to the speaker, it’s a good idea to have someone on call who lives reasonably close to the venue, so they can be there at short notice. Working with a speaker bureau/entertainment agency can help ensure there’s a backup plan. Alternatively, have an agreement in place with your other speakers/moderators that they will step in to cover in the event of the keynote not turning up.