Is Twitter doubling the number of characters available a good thing?

communications
publicrelations
twitter
socialmedia
promotion

(Melissa Saunders) #1

Well Twitter’s test results seem quite positive - retaining brevity for the most part but with improved ease, engagement and user time whilst reducing the time required for editing. Have to say I was concerned about the brevity which is a big reason why I like using twitter on a personal level - I can quickly scan through updates and only dig deeper if I need to - but have spent too much of my life editing down tweets in my professional capacity so I see the need. Twitter for events can be a fantastic tool so will this be a really positive move once it’s bedded in?


(Belinda Booker) #2

I really struggle with editing down tweets for clients (especially when you’re trying to squeeze in hashtags and tag other users etc), so from that perspective I think it’s a good thing. It has been a lot easier since Twitter stopped counting attached media in the character count. I no longer have to write lots of abbreviations, which is good - removing letters from words doesn’t sit well with me!


(Dewi) #3

This is a bad thing. Twitters original message length was always based around the 160 characters of a text message, 20 for the username and 140 for the message itself. It was also a mobile based social media platform.
Expanding to 280 characters has not only gone away from it’s unique selling point of 140 characters but also left it’s mobile only design. 280 character messages will quickly fill up a mobile phone screen and this will make the whole expierience very wordy.
Messages that contain moving images are the ones that get the most enagement so it’s bafffling why Twitter would want to double up on text to fill the screen.
Any business that deviates from it’s core business model is in a dangerous territory.


(Dewi) #4

Best way to get more text in a tweet is to create a square image that includes your message. People are more likely to look at text in an image rather than in a tweet.


(Melissa Saunders) #5

Time will tell. Do you think people will limit the character count themselves in the hope that more will read once the hype has settled down?


(Belinda Booker) #6

Great idea. And then use the character count for all the hashtagging and what have you.