What do you think about this sponsorship proposal email I received?


(Nick Lawson) #1

Hi EventTribers

I received this sponsorship proposal email (details redacted) for an event this morning and would love to know what you think of it/whether you would reply to it?

To me this smacks of a template email, thinly disguising itself with ‘matey/cheeky’ language. I don’t feel like there has been thought put in to communicate the value of this event to us and seems like they just want our cash, but maybe I’m being harsh…

What do you think?

(@Pheil the email i referenced in your post!)


(Melissa Saunders) #2

I’m really conflicted on this. Generally I don’t read anything that’s poorly formatted as it’s usually spam and this is appalling. Much of it is cringey but whoever sent it you has tried a different approach which has given them stand out. How many standard event promo emails do you get that you delete within seconds? I’d at least be curious about the event and probably get in touch with them to offer to sort their email marketing out.


(Sachin Bhalla) #3

I’ve sent emails like that…it is definitely a thinly-disguised template. I also highly doubt that “the final sponsorship slot” is somehow magically available.

That said, it was always nice to get responses so I could explain myself further. Not saying you definitely should reply. Time is precious, after all, and even a “no” would likely start an even more annoying exchange.

I think the sender is making the same mistake I did, however, by mentioning a discount right up front without fully saying how it would benefit you. I called my emails “diet spam,” in that I’d do at least some research on the promoter and would tailor it to the individual.

Also, I agree with @MelissaJane in that it is pretty poorly formatted.

Again, I’m guilty of annoying people, so I do feel for the sender. But I would say to trust your instincts and ignore it.


(Belinda Booker) #4

It would be much stronger if they explained the exact synergies between your company and their event to show a true understanding.


(Lotte E-H) #5

@nick_lawson this is funny, 3 of us in our very small company got this exact email last week. We all had a chat about it as felt that this type of ‘individual template’ style has been done thousands of times before and is a little stale now. I’d rather someone link with me on LinkedIn and we could have a chat from there to see if there was synergy in brands/personalities and objectives etc. I agree with @Belinda_Booker too - this could have been made much stronger if he’d taken the time to show how the brands/companies could compliment each other, rather than so obviously play the numbers game.


(Richard Heathcote) #6

Agree with the above - those sorts of emails make my skin crawl!

Faux personalisation just irritates me, especially when it’s ‘matey-matey’ like that! It’d get an immediate delete from me. At no point have the highlighted any benefits for you, let alone why it’s worth the money. And yes, unless it genuinely is the last place on offer, that gets my goat too.

(I’ve sent emails in the past to our member base mentioning last ticket remaining to various events etc, but that has always been genuine!)


(Melissa Saunders) #7

I never believe anyone saying it’s the last one available! Maybe i’m just cynical but it totally feels like a line.